Raw Material Information

 NBRCREPDMNRENSIIRSRBRSBR
Weather Resistance
Heat Resistance
Flame Resistance
Skid Resistance
Oil Resistance
Tear Resistance
NBR Nitrile Butadiene Rubber
CR Chloroprene Rubber
EPDM Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer
NR Natural Rubber
ENS Elastomer Non Stain
IIR Isobutylene Isoprene Rubber
SR Silicone Rubber
BR Butadiene Rubber
SBR Styrene Butadiene Rubber

  Excellent

  Good

  Fair

  Unacceptable

Material Details

Nitrile rubber, also known as NBR, Buna-N, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber, is a synthetic rubber copolymer of acrylonitrile (ACN) and butadiene. It is used in the automotive and aeronautical industry to make fuel and oil handling hoses, seals, grommets, and self-sealing fuel tanks, since ordinary rubbers cannot be used.[1] It is used in the nuclear industry to make protective gloves. NBR’s ability to withstand a range of temperatures from −40 to 108 °C (−40 to 226 °F) makes it an ideal material for aeronautical applications.

Chloroprene Rubber (CR), also known as chlorobutadiene rubber, is an important diene-based elastomer.

The chlorine in the polymer reduces the reactivity to many oxidizing agents and thus improves its chemical resistance. Due to its low reactivity, it displays good resistance to ozone cracking, heat aging and chemical attack. For example, it has good resistance to many chlorofluorocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, mineral oils, greases and ozone, but only moderate or poor resistance to acids, solvents, and fuels.

Its mechanical properties are generally inferior to those of natural rubber but it has superior chemical resistance.

EPDM is an M-Class rubber under ASTM standard D-1418; the M class comprises elastomers having a saturated chain of the polyethylene type (the M deriving from the more correct term polymethylene).

EPDM is derived from polyethylene into which 45-85 wt% of propylene have been copolymerised to reduce the formation of the typical polyethylene crystallinity.

As with most rubbers, EPDM is always used compounded with fillers such as carbon black and calcium carbonate, with plasticisers such as paraffinic oils, and has useful rubbery properties only when crosslinked.

Natural rubber, also called by other names of India rubber, latex, Amazonian rubber, caucho or caoutchouc, as initially produced, consists of polymers of the organic compound isoprene, with minor impurities of other organic compounds, plus water. Thailand and Indonesia are two of the leading rubber producers. Types of polyisoprene that are used as natural rubbers are classified as elastomers.

Natural rubber is used extensively in many applications and products, either alone or in combination with other materials. In most of its useful forms, it has a large stretch ratio and high resilience, and is extremely waterproof.

ENS rubber also known Elastomer Non Stain rubber, is a synthetic and natural rubber co-polymer. ENS rubber is formulated for rubber foot application as well as excellent skid resistance, non migration / marking, anti vibration and long ageing resiliency.

Butyl rubber, sometimes just called “butyl”, is a synthetic rubber, a copolymer of isobutylene with isoprene. The abbreviation IIR stands for isobutylene isoprene rubber. Polyisobutylene, also known as “PIB” or polyisobutene, (C4H8)n, is the homopolymer of isobutylene, or 2-methyl-1-propene, on which butyl rubber is based. Butyl rubber is produced by polymerization of about 98% of isobutylene with about 2% of isoprene. Structurally, polyisobutylene resembles polypropylene, but has two methyl groups substituted on every other carbon atom, rather than one. Polyisobutylene is a colorless to light yellow viscoelastic material. It is generally odorless and tasteless, though it may exhibit a slight characteristic odor.

Silicone rubber is an elastomer (rubber-like material) composed of silicone—itself a polymer—containing silicon together with carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen.

Silicone rubbers are widely used in industry, and there are multiple formulations. Silicone rubber is generally non-reactive, stable, and resistant to extreme environments and temperatures from −55 to 300 °C (−67 to 572 °F) while still maintaining its useful properties.

Due to these properties and its ease of manufacturing and shaping, silicone rubber can be found in a wide variety of products, including: voltage line insulators, automotive applications; cooking, baking, and food storage products; apparel such as undergarments, sportswear, and footwear; electronics; medical devices and implants; and in home repair and hardware with products such as silicone sealants.

Butadiene rubber, synthetic rubber widely employed in tire treads for trucks and automobiles. It consists of polybutadiene, an elastomer (elastic polymer) built up by chemically linking multiple molecules of butadiene to form giant molecules, or polymers. The polymer is noted for its high resistance to abrasion, low heat buildup, and resistance to cracking.

Styrene-butadiene or styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) describe families of synthetic rubbers derived from styrene and butadiene (the version developed by Goodyear is called Neolite). These materials have good abrasion resistance and good aging stability when protected by additives. In 2012, more than 5.4 million tonnes of SBR were processed worldwide.About 50% of car tires are made from various types of SBR. The styrene/butadiene ratio influences the properties of the polymer: with high styrene content, the rubbers are harder and less rubbery. SBR is not to be confused with the thermoplastic elastomer, styrene-butadiene block copolymer, although being derived from the same monomers.